Today's Discipleship Crisis | A Discussion with Corey Fifield

Podcast Seminary Podcast HeaderTodays Discipleship Crisis, Corey Fifield, phokos Facebook


Christian discipleship, including evangelism and the sharing of the gospel, is in trouble in many of today’s churches. This is something that can be addressed, but not without the resolve and sustained attention of churches and their leaders.
In this important dialogue on the subject by Podcast Seminary Dean, Dr. Freddy Cardoza, and Christian non-profit 501(c) ministry Global Phokos Founder, Corey Fifield, these issues are explored with candor and urgency.

Corey Fifield


Corey Fifield, Global Phokos Founder (facebook.com/globalphokos)
Corey Fifield

Freddy Cardoza


Freddy Cardoza, Podcast Seminary Dean
Freddy Cardoza


Tune in to hear two Christian leaders who care deeply about the gospel and Christian discipleship talk shop, in search of solutions.


Listen to the Discussion

Tom's Story

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WHAT’S YOUR STORY?
By the time I was 17 I had moved nineteen times. This pattern of inconsistency and uncertainty, coupled with mental illness, and without God had me living a life filled with everything the world said would complete me.
Four years in the U.S. Air Force followed by four years in a fraternity at San Diego State University led me down a road of self-destruction that should have killed me.
I accepted the Lord in 1989 and expected things to turn around. It didn’t. I can’t tell you why. It just wasn’t my time. God had other things in mind.
A brief stay in a mental hospital, followed by years of struggling to be normal was my life. It wasn’t until five years ago when I moved back to Irvine to take care of my Mom and Step-dad, that the light shined through and my understanding of life cleared.


WHAT BECAME THE TURNING POINT IN YOUR LIFE AS A DISCIPLE?
The most prolific event that happened was joining Saddleback church. I’ve been involved in some great churches but Pastor Rick Warren has built such a strong, solid church that ministers to a copious amount of ministries all across the world.
It was soon after joining I volunteered to be a leader at a junior-high camp. And the rest is history.
I’ve been four years with the same group of young men and my past has been something I share with these boys to put fear into them, but also to share that God has something much better for them, if obedient.
During these past five years, I’ve also written three books, which has been cathartic and exciting.


HOW MIGHT GOD USE PODCAST SEMINARY IN PEOPLE’S LIVES?
Three years ago, I met Freddy Cardoza at a Saddleback Church Men’s Retreat. We immediately hit it off and have become good friends.
His creation of Podcast Seminary has been nothing short of a miracle. Getting more of a behind the scenes view of this amazing site, I can say without a doubt that God is all over it. The amount of time he has given to creating something people would truly accept and use is humbling.
My hope is that people that are looking for an anchor in these trying times will use Podcast Seminary to help find their way.


Our thanks to Tom Bruner from Irvine, California for telling his story. Is God working in your life? Has Podcast Seminary challenged you to grow in your faith and relationship with God? If so, we encourage you to share your story with us as well! Simply email us!


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Snapchat Wisdom of College Ministry Do's and Don'ts

Blog Header New 2017 July large logo40 transparency x 1140Snapchat Wisdom on College Ministry Do’s and Don’ts, Facebook, August 11, 14


Eric Turner

Guest Post by Podcast Seminary friend, Dr. Eric Turner

See Eric’s bio on his website
See Eric’s Original Post


No, this is not a post about how to use Snapchat (or any other social media) for growing a college ministry.
Let me explain.
I had this crazy idea recently to flood all of the college students I know on Snapchat with an informal research question. For those who do not know, I have served as a college/singles pastor at Lenexa Baptist Church in Kansas City and I am currently a New Testament faculty member at Hannibal-LaGrange University. My point is, I know a lot of college students and I am always looking for wisdom on how better to engage in effective ministry towards them.
For the record, the number of students may not be statistically significant, but at least it was enough to arrive at some interesting conclusions. So, if you are currently doing college ministry or are pondering how to begin a college ministry, you may find what I am about to share helpful, or at least, insightful. Now, here is the Snapchat question I asked,
“What is one Do and one Don’t of College Ministry?”
I received a variety of response. Allow me to list a few of them for you and then I will draw together some observations/principles for those of us who seek to faithfully minister to this unique generation. Here is a sampling of what they said…

  • Do not expect an immediate response when starting your college ministry.
  • Form friendships with college students with the intent of sharing the gospel.
  • Do not dumb down the gospel.
  • Know your audience.
  • Do not isolate your students from the larger body of believers.
  • Open up your life to your students.
  • Do life with them.
  • Keep your ministry “missional,” get it outside the four walls of the church.
  • Be careful in choosing your leadership.
  • Stay relevant.
  • Use challenging material that will make them dig deep.
  • Do not have too much structure; the ministry should have an organic feel.
  • Teach theology to college students.

  • From these and from my experience in college ministry, here are a few observations/principles that may help you get on the right track.

    1. The size of your college ministry is not as important as you think it is.
    Very little was said about students wanting to be part of a large college ministry. What was noteworthy is that students appear to value substance over sheer numbers. Unfortunately, in the past and from a pastor’s perspective, we have used numbers to gauge success. From the perspective of students, this conversation is not on their radar. Therefore, you would do well as a college minister to not base your worth on the size of your group. Churches, I exhort you, stop playing the numbers game with your leaders.
    2. College students do not want shallow teaching, they long for depth.
    Over and over again, from a majority of the students polled, I heard that depth of teaching was a major factor in whether they were attracted to or stayed connected to a college ministry. One student sent me this response,
    I once had a Bible study on campus with students through Romans. You would not believe how hungry they were for depth. They had been given Sunday School answers all their life. Students love being part of meaningful conversations. I had one student so shocked that the Jews rejected Jesus, she slammed her fists on the table and yelled, “We need to tell them!”
    In other words, put away the games you played in youth group and start digging deep into Jesus.
    3. Relationships are more important than structure in college ministry.
    Often, we begin with the opposite strategy. We are taught to develop the structure (what we do) and then, when we attract students, the focus shifts to building relationships (who we are). Almost every student responded with something about the importance of relationships. None of them were concerned at all with the format of the ministry. As a caveat, this is not to say that you have zero structure, throwing caution to the wind as you drink coffee with your students in a casual atmosphere. What I am noting is the priority you place on building relationships. In other words, focus more on who you are rather than what you do. As one student boldly declared, build a relationship with me before you lecture me.

    4. College students need engagement with the wider body of Christ, not isolation.

    Here is a secret worth its ministry weight in gold. College students want to serve in your church. Give them leadership opportunities, however, as one student rightly said, do not allow students to serve if they are living a life of unrepentant sin. Connect students with married couples, senior adults, and above all, find places for them to serve out of the gifts they possess. Just because they are college students does not mean that they share in less of a portion of the Holy Spirit.
    5. Patience is a must as you seek to disciple college students.
    One of the first “snaps” that I received back read, do not get discouraged when students seem to be living double lives, continue pouring into them. Another remarked, do not make decisions for your students when they come to you for advice. Help them make their own decisions. I have discovered that ministry to college students is often messy, but you know, so is ministry to any other age group. It takes a calm, wise, and patient leader to help guide students into Christ-likeness.
    6. You have to be willing to open your life before college students.
    I would note, if you are going to do effective, long-term ministry to college students, this principle is non-negotiable. They want to have fun with you as a leader, but they do not want you to act like a college student. They crave examples that they can follow and imitate. They want encouragement, but they value transparency the most. One student wisely said, be willing to just hang out with me – but remember, it doesn’t always have to be about coffee. Some of our deepest relationships have been and continue to be built as open our home and our lives (for better or for worse) to college students.
    7. Food, food, food…
    It may seem simplistic, but if you feed them, they will come. One of the replies was telling as it got right to the point; food – it is hard to hear over a grumbling stomach. Remember this well and get this next sentence embedded in your strategy. A home-cooked meal may be the lifeline that a college student is longing for, especially if they eat off of a meal plan in their campus cafeteria, but even more importantly, if they are struggling with homesickness and afraid to tell someone. For many, this is the first time they have been separated from family. Your family could become their family.
    Again, this post is a somewhat unscientific assessment on the best practices and common pitfalls of college ministry, the do’s and don’ts. But, I believe what is important to consider is that these principles are drawn from college students themselves. So, if you are doing college ministry or thinking of starting one, heed this practical wisdom. I truly believe that the generation that is in college right now is poised to do significant kingdom work. My prayer is that we see incredible gospel results as we faithfully minister to them.


    About Eric

    Adopted from the Missouri Baptist Children’s Home in St. Louis, Eric Turner is a Hannibal, Missouri native who recently joined the faculty at Hannibal-LaGrange University. Before accepting the position as Assistant Professor of New Testament and Greek in 2014, Eric served as Interim Pastor at Liberty Baptist Church in Liberty, MO, Senior Pastor at First Baptist Church in Braymer, MO and College/Singles Pastor at Lenexa Baptist Church in Lenexa, KS.
    Dr. Turner currently holds a Ph.D. in Biblical Studies – New Testament Emphasis from Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, MO. His dissertation research focused on identifying and interpreting linguistic metaphor in Second Corinthians. The ultimate goal of the research was to show that a modern linguistic model for English metaphor can be applied to the Greek New Testament with profitable outcomes for the interpretation of historically difficult passages.
    Outside the classroom, Dr. Turner can be found running, playing guitar, riding motorcycles, or traveling. He has been married to his wife Stephanie for 23 years and together they have four children. He and his family are avid St. Louis Cardinals fans.

    Contact Dr. Eric Turner

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Hear Ron's Story (Part 2) and the Story of His Involvement in Launching Podcast Seminary [PODCAST]

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Listen to “Ron’s Story

We often say that “everybody has a story.” That’s certainly true with Ron. This is part two of a first-ever live Podcast Seminary interview in Studio C Los Angeles (see the studio).


In Part 2 of this audio interview, Ron talks Discipleship. We discuss some of the needs Christians and churches have in discipleship today, along with needed solutions. You’ll also hear about Ron’s involvement in the formulation of Podcast Seminary– from a single discussion had after a discipleship event in 2016.


Listen Now


Your Turn

Do you have a story? We want to hear about it. People want to read it! We are even willing to consider featuring your story on PodcastSeminary.com/blog in a future post like this one.
Your StoryConnect with me through leaving a comment below or by going to the Contact page, and we’ll get started!

Why You Behave the Way You Do [Blog Post]

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Why You Behave the Way You Do

If you’re sometimes confused and even surprised by the things you do (especially the bad things), you’re not alone. Perhaps the only thing more shocking that why we behave why we do– is why others behave the way they do!
People everywhere feel the same. Not only now, but for millennia, human behavior has been a topic of discussion and concern. Civilizations throughout history have wanted to understand human behavior and its motivations. Good behavior is no problem. It enriches the world and only makes things better. It’s the bad behavior that concerns people. That’s because of the toll that bad behavior exacts on people, communities, and society at large.
In response to bad behavior, ‘laws’ are created, along with civil, meaning “state” or government punishments. But all laws only discourage behavior, not necessarily prevent it. Civilized societies discovered a long time ago that we can legislate behavior, but that we cannot externally change the human heart.
In fact, as long as a person is willing to deal with the odds of either getting caught and/or the consequences of their decisions, ‘laws’ and other external forces meant to curb behavior have little or no effect. That isn’t to say we shouldn’t have laws– we should and must. But it’s important to understand that laws operate at the lowest level of personal character– external behavior, rather than at the root of behavior, which is its source: the human heart.

Human Behavior is a Wild Card

That leads us to the problem. The problem is that human behavior is a wild card. It’s not always predictable. And that’s because people have free will. We call ‘free will’ “agency.” Agency is the ability to make choices freely, according to one’s own desires. So people are “agents,” and we have the God-given ability to choose what we want to do.
God’s made it that way, even though free will comes with the necessity that we can choose something other than ‘good.’ After all, “free will” wouldn’t be free if people couldn’t ‘will’ “freely.” In other words, if the only choice is “do what is right and good,” then there’s really no choice– then choices are actually determined, not free. So that’s the conundrum of free will– that, to get it, we have to open the possibility of bad behavior.
It isn’t as if God didn’t know that when He conceptualized and, in His inscrutible wisdom, choose to give us free will. There simply was no middle way: logically it wasn’t possible to create free will without the possibility of bad behavior. But God (apparently) deemed it “better” to offer free will or “personal agency” to us than to create a world of wound-up, determined robots going through the motions of a mechanized world. So it was either that– or freedom…. or to just create nothing at all. So, because God is greater and infinitely wise, He created an equitable system where, by the end of it all, He’d work out every injustice and circumvent every illegitimate human hurt, through His great providence, purpose, and wisdom.
So that takes care of part of the issue– that, ultimately, justice for bad human behavior will be addressed, and that God will redeem every injustice and give us everlasting bliss as believers– but FOR NOW, we still have the temporal and troubling daily issue of dealing with our, and others, free will– and the decisions and behaviors that go with it.
That said, the problem is that, sometimes, what we want to do has negative ramifications. Freedom has consequences– and it can produce both positive and negative outcomes.

The Apostle Paul Nailed It

An often-quoted statement from the Apostle Paul in the New Testament nails it:
“I am a slave to sin. 15 I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do. I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For I do not do the good I want to do, but the evil I do not want to do—this I keep on doing. So I find this law at work: Although I want to do good, evil is right there with me. In my inner being I delight in God’s law; but I see another law at work in me, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the sin at work within me. (Romans 7:14-21 excerpts, New Testament)
How much clearer could it be? Written thousands of years ago, we find ourselves sitting beside Paul, with our own hands gripping his ink-dipped quill, helping him write these words.
Paul was dealing with a profoundly important and personal issue we all face: our behavior.
Fundamentally, we behave the way we do because of the two or three causes or mitigating factors: Human behavior can be largely explained by these three factors:
Human Behavior is affected by the fact that we have moral agency– the fact that we have “free will.” I prefer the phrase ‘agency’ but free will is more common of a term and more broadly understood. Some of us who traffic in theology feel there are better ways and more exacting ways to communicate it, but for the simplicity of the discussion, let’s go with “free will.”
Human Behavior is affected by the fact that we have a fallen nature. Our human condition is compromised. We are broken. More about that in a minute.
Human Behavior is mitigated by the possession of and response to factors that include the activity and our response to the Human Conscience (in all people) and the presence or absence of the Holy Spirit in a person’s life (Christian believers).
Now, let’s go back to the topic of this post (behavior) and to the current series– How to Have a Clear Conscience, and see how these relate to human behavior.
Theologians call this problem “Original Sin.” And sometimes it’s also called the Fall of Adam.
The Bible speaks about it in Romans 5:12, through the Apostle Paul. He writes: “Therefore, just as sin entered the world through one man, and death through sin, and in this way death came to all people, because all sinned.”
Here the Bible is speaking of the fact that spiritual brokenness entered the human experience (“just as sin entered the world”) through Adam, the Original Human Being (“through one man”), that sin brought physical and spiritual separation from God (“and death through sin”). And because of this Original Sin of Adam, that condition of being spiritually and physically separated from God was from then on inherited by all people, everywhere (“and in this way death came to all people, because all sinned”).
Wait! What Do You Mean We Have “Original Sin?”
I know, it’s startling. The idea that all people are broken is hard to swallow. Even harder is the idea that every person, when they are born, have something deeply and intrinsically wrong in their personhood. Just the idea– we don’t like it. And on that basis, many people simply reject the idea of Original Sin as being over the top.
So I realize that it’s a sobering concept, but I also believe the existence and reality of Original Sin is demonstrable in several ways. I like to think of it this way…

Indications of Original Sin

When a child is born and is only moments old (this is going to be tough to read, so brace yourself), we already know that, embedded within that child’s humanity is the condition of being mortal. In other words, when a child is born, we know that that child (and every child who ever lived) has a date of terminus– the child, whether he or she grows up or grows old, will ultimately die.
This is true, even if we could keep that person from any physical or medical threat. In such a case, even if no tragedy befell them, we KNOW that even that person would ultimately die of, if nothing else, “old age.”
Mortality affects 100% of people. And mortality itself is a direct result of Original Sin. And so is aging. If Original Sin didn’t exist, it seems that aging, disease, dying, and the like simply wouldn’t make a lot of sense. Why, after all, would or should anyone necessarily die? What explanation might be given for aging and dying of old age, if not Original Sin?
But in addition to this, consider another really obvious indication of “Original SIn.” Specifically, the idea that every person is “born with” a negative moral condition of being fallen. And it seems to me that this is demonstrably true.
Consider this: No good parent ever taught their child to do anything wrong. But kids do wrong things sometimes– even frequently. In fact, not only do we “not have to teach children to do ‘evil,’” they choose to do it quite naturally. In fact, kids often exhibit bad behavior IN SPITE OF the fact that we teach them constantly about good behavior!
What’s more, the very fact that we feel that we NEED to teach people to “behave” shows the implicit realization we have that people, left to themselves, will not always behave very well.
That’s a tacit admission that we innately realize that people carry an inherent brokenness. Meaning, functionally speaking, everyone– deep down– knows that all humans are not only capable of doing bad things– but that people can and will do bad things at times, out of their own volition, even when they are taught to do otherwise. In fact, even with the threat of punishment or pain, people of all ages, including children, naturally and quite easily choose bad behavior at times.
This isn’t meant to be negative— it’s just to establish an important theological truth: That Original Sin exists and that, inherently, we know it– even though it’s hard to admit.

Understanding Our Broken Nature

And because our human nature is broken, we do things we shouldn’t. We do things we don’t want to do. We do things others don’t want us to do. And we do things that, as a result, harm us… and others. These things harm us in all kinds of ways– sometimes emotionally; sometimes relationally; sometimes mentally; sometimes physically– and sometimes our behavior harms us in all of those ways.
So it’s important to understand human behavior and to get this figured out because it affects us (and others), including the ones we love, on a regular, even daily basis.

What Original Sin Does

It’s pretty clear that Original Sin is a serious thing. It has contaminated us. By that Original Sin passing from Adam on to us, we now have the natural predisposition to do things we shouldn’t do. We are, if you please, hard-wired in a way that we sometimes gravitate toward becoming unruly and even rebellious.
Let’s go just a little deeper.
First, I should say that I realize some people won’t or don’t like this idea. In fact, some are even ‘offended’ by it. That, plus it seems counterintuitive.
Didn’t God Create Us as Perfect Beings?
The reasoning against Original Sin goes something like this:

  1. God is perfect.
  2. God created a perfect world (as seen in Paradise or Eden, Genesis 1-3).
  3. In that perfect world he placed perfect people.
  4. These people were created in His image and, as such, must have been perfect and therefore– fundamentally good.

Well, almost.
On the surface it sounds perfectly logical. And it’s almost correct. But there’s more to it than what’s at face value.

  • God is perfect. That part is right on the money.
  • Also, God did create a perfect world. Again, good.

And in that perfect would, God created perfect people. Here, we have to say both, “yes” and “not exactly.” When God created Adam and Eve, they were “functionally perfect” in that they were newly created and had not sinned. But that did not mean they were completely perfect in terms of their human nature.
Don’t miss this.
Adam and Eve were created and were without sin. But because they were created, and finite, they were fundamentally different than God. And as created beings, though they were made “in God’s image,” they were not capable of receiving a completely incorruptible human nature. So while they were created as innocent and without sin, they were given free will and this (coupled with the fact that they were human and not God Himself) made them vulnerable.
Then, ultimately, Lucifer was expelled from Heaven due to his rebellion against God– he exploited this human vulnerability (free will or agency) and the corruptible (but then-innocent) nature of people was tempted and humanity fell.
This fallenness has been passed on, since that time, to all of us. It is the root cause of our estrangement from God, our personal issues, our bad behavior, and our moral weakness, in addition to a host of other things.
And if we take that issue, Original Sin, and add it to on-going human agency, our free will takes us places. And that… is why we behave the way we do.


Learn more about this truth by listening to our similarly-themed but different podcast series (www.podcastseminary.org) and our vlog series (http://www.podcastseminary.net).

Corey's Story

Blog Header New 2017 July logoCoreys Story, Facebook


Corey’s Salvation Story

The gospel message of salvation by grace through faith in the finished work of Jesus Christ has saved my soul and completely changed my life. Having no religious background in my upbringing, I experienced a radical conversion to Christianity in my early 20’s. I immediately joined a Bible believing local church, was baptized, and made discipleship in the faith a priority. Two years later, with a hunger to dive deeper, I enrolled as a student at the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, achieving a Bachelor’s Degree in Biblical Studies in 2006.

Corey’s Ministry Story

While a student at Moody, I developed a heart for missions, and later founded a non-profit organization named “Phokos” (On Facebook @globalphokos). I’m so grateful to God for my salvation, and I want to see others saved. I want to see churches strengthened. I want to see the tides of our time shift. Romans 1:16 says, “The GOSPEL is the POWER of God…” I believe it STILL is. John Wesley said, “Give me 100 preachers who fear nothing but sin, and desire nothing but God, and I care not a straw whether they be clergymen or laymen; such alone will shake the gates of hell and set up the Kingdom of Heaven on Earth.”

How Corey’s Story Connects with Podcast Seminary

As important as evangelism is to me, I cannot overstate the great emphasis the New Testament places on DISCIPLESHIP. Equally important to the New Testament call of evangelism, is the call to DISCIPLE. For this reason, I applaud Dr. Freddy Cardoza and his work with Podcast Seminary. True to their mission, “Podcast Seminary wants to help you grow spiritually, and will give you a step-by-step spiritual growth strategy for personal growth.”
Podcast Seminary likens their step-by-step spiritual growth strategy to climbing an “ivory tower.” This is a great comparison, and shows why Podcast Seminary will prove to be a great resource for Christians of every level of spiritual maturity. There’s one kind of beauty at the entrance, but there’s so much more to see! Even if you’ve advanced to a certain height, you may find something that you needed to rediscover.
Just recently, my eyes welled up with tears as I watched a Podcast Seminary Vlog. Life can be challenging, and even Christians face hardships and trials, but I was so blessed to be reminded of “God’s Omniscience” (Part 5 of the “Enjoy the Ride” series).
God used Dr. Freddy Cardoza to remind me that “God is ALL-KNOWING” and that “God’s knowledge allows Him to calculate the events of our lives in perfect timing.” I was reminded afresh that “God knows everything,” and because He is good, I can trust Him through anything. A big heart, a deep mind, and a sincere desire to see people grow in their faith is what’s behind this great work. Tune in, and tell others!


Learn More or Partner in Corey’s Vision and Phokos

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Your Turn

Do you have a story? I want to hear about it. I am even willing to consider featuring your story on PodcastSeminary.com/blog in a future post like this one.
Your StoryConnect with me through leaving a comment below or by going to the Contact page, and we’ll get started!

3 Steps to Make Men From Mice (Audio Podcast)

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God doesn’t want us to live in fear—but many do.
This session is to challenge us not to fear, but to overcome it with courage.
Throughout scripture, God says it again, and again, and again—Fear Not; Be Not Afraid, Be Strong and Courageous, and other similar phrases— a few hundred times, in fact. So it’s clear that God doesn’t want us to be afraid.
But how do we overcome debilitating fear? Important tips are presented here in this special episode.
Want even more? Check out my long-talk given at a men’s retreat for Saddleback Church in 2016. Check it out


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Is Jesus Really the Only Way? ("Can I Ask That?" Video Series)

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Can I Ask That? Series


Is Jesus Really the Only Way?

“Can I Ask That?” Video Series: Session 7 of 7

Is Jesus Really the Only Way?
As a Christian, I say “Yes” and for good reason. But the Bible makes it clear that not only “Christians” should believe in Jesus. Rather, God wants everyone to believe and follow Christ as Lord (boss). How can God make such an audacious ask? Well, for one thing– He’s God! But there’s more…
God makes claim on being the only way to eternal life because of a few logical facts: No other person in the history of humanity ever rose from the dead—except Jesus. What’s more, no other faith even has the audacity to teach such a thing— except Christianity. The Bible uses that central fact as the primary truth on which the entire Christian faith rises and falls.
Once Jesus rose from the dead, he stuck around the next 40 days to prove He had risen and defeated death, something documented to believers and skeptics alike. In doing so, this became the greatest attested miracle in history. The Resurrection of Jesus is the #1 Mic Drop of all time.
And through the Resurrection, Jesus demonstrated that He is all powerful, by personally overcoming death—after having lived the greatest moral life in history.


Listening Challenge: Learn More About How Christianity Contrasts with Other Faiths

LEARN ABOUT CHRISTIANITY


On the basis of who He was and is, Jesus claimed to be God in the flesh, the Son of God. He claimed that He was the one Way, the One Truth, and the One way to Eternal Life. Since Jesus lived a life of perfection that should be the model for all people—and because Jesus alone raised from the dead and since no one before or since has claimed or proven the same as Jesus, He has the sole right to make such an audacious claim.
But ironically, that’s not the major hurdle for people. Once they realize all this, you would think it would be impossible to object to Jesus being the One and Only Way. But that objection is just a smokescreen.
If God gave us 2 ways, instead of one way to God, people would remain unhappy. If God gave them 2 ways instead of 3, they’d be unhappy. Even if God said, you can have a million ways—we’d still want one more. You see, the problem with Jesus being the only way isn’t really Jesus. It’s that, as humans, we want COMPLETE AUTONOMY. We resist submitting because we want to be our own and only authority. But because Jesus lived a perfect life, unlike us, and died for our salvation, unlike us, and raised from the dead on His own power, unlike us or anyone else, Jesus is Lord of All, and insists that He and He only is the Only Way to God. It makes complete sense.



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What is a Study Bible? (Video)

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What is a Study Bible? Aren’t all Bibles just, well, Bibles?
Not exactly. There are five types of Bibles, as we have been learning in this seven-part series on the Podcast Seminary vlog on our YouTube Channel. View this video to learn more about the essentials of a Study Bible, then go view the entire series to learn all the details on the other Bible types. Then, if you like it– share it. And we’d appreciate your feedback or questions on the comments section below or on our YouTube Channel!



Have Questions?

If you have a spiritual question, a biblical or theological question, or discipleship question about God, drop us an email at dean@podcastseminary.com!